Brazil’s Lula converted his commitment to cut CO2 emissions into legislation


President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva signed today (Tuesday) a law that requires Brazil to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 39 percent by 2020, meeting a commitment made at the Copenhagen climate talks.

Brazil announced at the summit a “voluntary commitment” to reduce CO2 emissions by between 36.1 and 38.9 percent in the next 10 years.

The law is subject to several decrees setting out responsibilities and regulations for the farming, industrial, energy, and environmental sectors. Nevertheless, before signing the new law, Lula vetoed three of its provisions, including a reference to “promoting the development of clean energy sources and the gradual phasing out of energy from fossil fuels.”

President Lula had said on his weekly radio program Coffee with the President, last October that Brazil will offer to reduce the pace of deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon rain forest by 80 percent by 2020 when he attends December’s global climate talks in Copenhagen.

To me, Copenhagen’s most important bequest is the commitments that leaders made, paving the way to even greater efforts for greater reductions in CO2 emissions, protection of tropical forests and biodiversity and aid to developing counties which will promote the development of green technologies and help mitigate the effects of climate change.

It is also promising that politicians have realised the impacts that climate change will have to their nations, and react – slowly, by making promises, so far, to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and move towards clean energy technologies.

The fact that these efforts are still in national or regional level do not make them less significant. Climate change is the result of many individual and local decisions. Local solutions may be the most efficient and prompt way to reduce greenhouse gases, fight environmental problems, such as deforestation and pollution and mitigate the impacts of climate change. These efforts may lead the way towards a more efficient and complete global deal in 2010.

Source and further reading: Grist

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